Fermented Foods: Green Pastures Fermented Cod Liver Oil Review & Giveaway

THIS GIVEAWAY IS OVER!!!  The winners have been notified via email and have 48 hours to respond.

CONGRATULATIONS TO:

Celene E.
Jasanna C.
Peggy C.

I was given the chance to try and write up a review for Green Pasture’s Fermented Cod Liver Oil (or FCLO).  I was pretty well used to taking the capsules, so I wanted to see how it would be to take the straight oil.  I chose the Cinnamon Tingle flavor and surprisingly it wasn’t as bad as you would think.

What IS Fermented Cod Liver Oil?

Simply put it is fermented fish/fish liver oil.   It’s a supplement made from the liver of cod fish.  It contains high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, EPA, DHA and high levels of vitamins A and D.

FCLO is a traditional food.  It was a standard supplement in traditional European societies.  The ancient Roman Empire used it to maintain strength of their troops, each soldier was given a ration.  The ancient Vikings are said to have kept a barrel of fermenting cod liver oil outside the doors of their homes at all times.

FCLO is made by the traditional method of fermenting the cod livers with no heat involved.  Thousands of micronutrients are present in this oil, including several natural forms of vitamin A and D.  It truly is a whole food supplement.

Most cod liver oil is made by cooking the whole cod body tissues of fatty fish during the manufacture of fish meal.  This process destroys the natural vitamin A and D present in cod livers.

Fish oil is similar, but has much lower levels of vitamins A and D.

Green Pasture is the only company that makes Raw Fermented Cod Liver Oil.  They use a slow and traditional lacto-fermentation process which preserves the nutritional value, possibly even increasing the nutrients as most lacto-fermenting does.

Why is it so good?

1.  It contains high amounts of EPA and DHA, which are both essential Omega-3 fatty acids.  DHA is needed for proper brain and nervous system function.  It also contains Omega-6, Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids.

2.  It contains high levels of fat-soluble vitamin A.  2/3 of a teaspoon contains approximately 475-792 IU of Retinol and 4,171-11,847 IU of Palmitate, both natural forms of vitamin A.  According to the Weston A. Price Foundation:

“Weston Price considered the fat-soluble vitamins, especially vitamin A, to be the catalysts on which all other biological processes depend.  Efficient mineral uptake and utilization of water-soluble vitamins require sufficient vitamin A in the diet.  His research demonstrated that generous amounts of vitamin A insure healthy reproduction and offspring with attractive wide faces, straight teeth and strong sturdy bodies.

He discovered that healthy primitives especially value vitamin-A-rich foods for growing children and pregnant mothers.  The tenfold disparity that Price discovered between primitive diets and the American diet in the 1940s is almost certainly greater today as Americans have forsworn butter and cod liver oil for empty, processed polyunsaturates.”  (source)

3.  And also vitamin D, a nutrient that most Americans are deficient in, especially those living in colder climates that get less sun.  As many of you should already know, vitamin D is important for bone strength, but it’s also important for blood sugar balance, fertility, cancer prevention and much more.  2/3 of a teaspoon contains approximately 2,145-6,744 IU of vitamin D2 and 110-218 IU of vitamin D3.

Again, I’m just going to quote the Weston A. Price Foundation because I cannot say it better myself:

“This marvelous golden oil contains large amounts of elongated omega-3 fatty acids, preformed vitamin A and the sunlight vitamin D, essential nutrients that are hard to obtain in sufficient amounts in the modern diet.  Samples may also naturally contain small amounts of the important bone- and blood-maintainer vitamin K.

There is hardly a disease in the books that does not respond well to treatment that includes cod liver oil, and not just infectious diseases but also chronic modern diseases like heart disease and cancer.  Cod liver oil provides vitamin D that helps build strong bones in children and helps prevent osteoporosis in adults.  The fatty acids in cod liver oil are also very important for the development of the brain and nervous systems.  “If you want to prevent learning disabilities in children,” said David Horrobin, distinguished medical biochemical researcher, “feed them cod liver oil.”

Cod liver oil contains more vitamin A and more vitamin D per unit weight than any other common food.  One hundred grams of regular cod liver oil provides 100,000 IU of vitamin A, almost three times more that beef liver, the next riches source, and 10,000 IU vitamin D, almost four times more than lard, the next richest source.  Of course, cod liver oil is only consumed in small amounts, but even a tablespoon (about 15 grams) provides well over the recommended daily allowance in both nutrients.”
(source)

Why are the amounts “aproximate”?  The concentration of these naturally occurring vitamins vary from batch to batch.  The figures vary for a variety of reasons: this includes the fact that the tests used for the naturally occurring vitamins do not always reflect the exact nutrient density of the oils because the tests are designed to detect synthetic and not natural vitamins.

You can also view the Green Pasture Statment of Purity.

How much to take?

Weston A. Price Foundation recommends the following dosage:

Children age 3 months to 12 years: 1/2 teaspoon or 2.5 mL, providing 4650 IU vitamin A and 975 IU vitamin D.

Children over 12 and adults: 1 teaspoon or 10 capsules, providing 9500 IU vitamin A and 1950 IU vitamin D.

Pregnant and nursing women: 2 teaspoons or 20 capsules, providing 19,000 IU vitamin A and 3900 IU vitamin D.

Note: Green Pasture’s suggested serving is about 1/2 the amount as the above recommendations.  For many people this is enough to see results, but certainly take the higher dosages should not cause any problems as this is technically a food.

Blue Ice FCLO Liquid Jan 20101

How to take it?

You could opt to take it straight, though it will probably take some getting used to.  A lot of people choose to mix it into other things.  Here are a few ideas to get you started:

1.  Mix it into a glass of fresh squeezed orange juice.

2.  Mix it into your morning cup of coffee.

3.  Mix into a smoothie.

4.  Take a spoonful and chase it with milk.

5.  I’ve read one person who just formed a teaspoon of cold gel into pill shapes and then froze them individually.  That way you can just swallow the frozen “pill” no problem.  I personally have not tried this.  But it’s quite thick when refrigerated so I think it would work well.

6.  Mix the cinnamon tingle flavored oil into apple sauce.  You won’t taste the fishyness of it I’m told.

MY Personal Experience and Opinion!
(in other words, my review)

I LOVE FCLO!!!  I’ve taken the capsules, Cinnamon Tingle Oil and the kid tested Emulsified Peppermint Oil.

It doesn’t even take me a week to notice the benefits.  When I’m taking it my skin is softer and not dry at all (if you know me, you know I can’t say that too often), my adult acne clears up considerably and I have more energy.  I have never had any allergy symptoms while taking FCLO either.

It’s a bit more economical to take the oil since you need less to get the dosage in.

I found that with both oil flavors I could mix it into my coffee in the mornings and it is actually quite pleasant.  It almost felt like I was drinking an expensive flavored coffee.

THE GIVEAWAY!!!!

Now for the fun part!  GreenPasture.com has agreed to give three (3) lucky winners each a coupon worth $44 towards their own bottle of Fermented Cod Liver Oil!

To sign up simply click the link below:

RAFFLECOPTOR GIVEAWAY
(it will open in a Facebook page)

While I do love comments on my blog posts, any comment here will not count towards the giveaway, except for the required entry to post a comment (see widget).  Please make sure to use the Rafflecoptor Widget linked above.

I will use Rafflecoptor, powered by random.org to choose the winner, who will be announced on the blog and will receive an email.  The giveaway is open to continental U.S. residents only.  This giveaway begins at 12:00 am on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 and ends on 12:00 am on July 17, 2013.  Winners will be announced on Thursday, July 11th.

This post was included in:
Lilac’s Linky July 11 – 16

GOOD LUCK!!!!

Disclaimer to this post:  I do not in any way profess to be a doctor.  The above is based on my own research and experience.  Your own experience may differ from mine.  As always, take any food or supplement at your own risk (or lack of risk) as the case may be.  By all means, do your own research on anything you ingest.

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35 responses to “Fermented Foods: Green Pastures Fermented Cod Liver Oil Review & Giveaway

  1. I LOVE Green Pastures FCLO!!!!!! it would be wonderful to win this contest!!!!

  2. I’ve never used FCLO, but your review convinced me to try it!

  3. never have used it..

  4. I would love to try this product, especially to help my adult acne. Thanks so much!!!

  5. I have never used FCLO, but have read alot about fermented foods, and I would love to try this product.

  6. I’ve been meaning to try FCLO forever, I never seem to be able to scrape the money together….winning would be such a great way to get there!

  7. For some reason I have not taken my FCLO lately. I wonder if that is why I am feeling so cruddy.

  8. We love the cinnamon. All 4 of my kids take it no problem

  9. Never tried FCLO, but would love a chance to try it.

  10. I have never tried it but I will be soon.

  11. Its the best. my grandkids love the taste. thanks

  12. love this oil. my grandkids look forward to the cinnamon tingle!

  13. This stuff is great, I tried to order some and they charge ALOT for shipping (like $50 to Alaska). Just be ready for that when ordering!!

  14. I currently take colson cod liver oil and have been wanting to try this one.

    • When I can’t afford to order FCLO I take the best my budget will allow me from the health food store. But I deft see faster and better results from taking the FCLO.

  15. me and kiddo take our fclo every morning together (just off a spoon, with a chaser of raw milk). I’m getting low on my last bottle though, so it would be perfect timing to win a bottle :)

    • wow, to me that combination just sounds extra nutritious!! It’s not that easy to get raw milk where I am because I don’t have a car to go pick it up. It’s such a shame every health food store can’t carry it.

  16. Ohhh I ordered a bottle today – but I don’t mind getting another one for free :)

  17. We take FCLO! Still trying to find a way that I don’t mind taking it. I will try coffee.

  18. Gail Littlejohn

    I have not tried the Fermented version of Cod Liver Oil, but I would be excited to take the Cinnamon FCLO.

  19. Sally Fallon’s lecture on Nourishing Traditional Diets really sold me on Fermented Cod Liver Oil. Now if only I could regularly afford it!

    • I’m in the same boat as you, it’s difficult to afford to keep it in the house all the time. Sometimes I go months in between being able to order any.

  20. I learned about FCLO from Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist but I haven’t bought it yet. I just read that it helps adult acne and improves your energy level so I’m even more motivated to get some! I love everything fermented!!!

  21. I have used this for quite awhile. Great product!

  22. JUSTBAUGHT MY FIRST BOTTLE OF FCLO(FLAVOR FREE) AND EXCITED TO TRY IT!

  23. I use it all the time!

  24. I have always wanted to try this!! Thanks for this chance ;)

  25. I have! and it’s pricey so I really would love winning. :)

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